Tag Archives: WordPress Security

Evaluating Cookies to Hide Backdoors

Identifying website backdoors is not always an easy task. Since a backdoors primary function is to conceal itself while providing unauthorized access, they are often developed using a variety of techniques that can make it challenging to detect. For example, an attacker can inject a single line of code containing less than 130 characters into More Info »

SEO Spam Links in Nulled Plugins

It’s not unusual to see website owners running things on a budget. Choosing a safe and reliable hosting company, buying a nice domain name, boosting posts on social media, and ranking on search engines — all this costs a lot of money. At the end of the day, some site owners may even choose to More Info »

Fake WordPress Functions Conceal assert() Backdoor

A few weeks ago, I was manually inspecting some files on a compromised website. While checking on a specific WooCommerce file, I noticed something interesting. Among 246 other lines, this very specific part stood out to me: $config = wp_dbase_config_init(‘_as_sert’); For those readers familiar with PHP functions commonly misused by hackers, you may have already More Info »

Hackers Love Expired Domains

Sometimes, website owners no longer want to own a domain name and they allow it to expire without attempting to renew it. This happens all the time and is totally normal, but it’s important to remember that attackers regularly monitor domain expirations and may target certain domains that meet specific criteria. Vendor domains can be More Info »

Code Comments Reveal SCP-173 Malware

We sometimes find malware code injections that contain strange code comments, which are normally used by programmers to annotate a section of code — for example, a short description of a feature or functionality for other developers to reference. Oftentimes, hackers aren’t interested in leaving comments describing how their injected malware works. Instead, they use More Info »

Backdoor Shell Dropper Deploys CMS-Specific Malware

A large majority of the malware we find on compromised websites are backdoors that allow an attacker to maintain unauthorized access to the site and execute whatever commands they want. Another common scenario includes malware which is directly injected into a website’s files and used to redirect traffic, steal credit cards and other sensitive information, More Info »